A Brief History Of The Traveling Funfair

Fairs in this country have a long and ancient history, deeply rooted in tradition.

The word fair is derived from the Latin 'feria', meaning a holiday and at one time the Romans were credited with the introduction of fairs.

It is now generally accepted that their origins are from pagan customs of the people who first settled this land; their seasonal gatherings held for the purposes of both trade and festivity, contained within them the essential elements of the fair.

The Romans did much to promote fairs by improving trade and communications throughout the country.

During the centuries following the departure of the Romans, many fairs and other festivals were incorporated into the calendar of the growing Christian Church. Charters granted by the sovereign gain the fair legal status and an increasing importance in the economic life of the nation.

Merchants and traders from Europe, the Middle East and beyond were drawn to the great chartered fairs of the Middle Ages bringing with them a wealth of goods.

The sheer number of these fairs, no fewer than 4860 were chartered between the years 1200 and 1400, drew not only merchant but entertainers as well: jugglers, musicians and tumblers – the ancestors of today's showmen.

The Black Death of 1348-49 thought about a new kind of fair. In order to stem the rise in wages caused by the shortage of workers, Edward III introduced the Statue of Labourers. This compelled all able bodied men to present themselly for hire at a stipulated wage. These gathering or burning fairs were held mainly around Michealmas, the end of the agricultural year.

By the early eighth century the trading aspects of the charter fairs had waned and most fairs consistently almost entirely of amusements, acrobats, illusionists and theatrical companies all plied their trade on fairgrounds.

Around this time the first fairground rides begin to appear, small crudely constructed out of wood and propelled by gangs of boys.

In 1868, Frederick Savage, a successful agricultural engineer from Kings Lynn, devised a method of driving rides by steam. His invention, a steam engine mounted in the center of the ride was to transform the fairground industry. Freed from the limitations of muscle power, rides could have made larger, more massive and more heavily ornamented. The showman's demand for novelty was matched by the ingenuity of Savage and other engineers.

In the wake of the steam revolution an amazing variety of new designs and rides appeared. These rides were the forerunners of today's amazing thrill rides, over time innovations such as electric lighting, electric motors, hydraulics etc. allowed rides to evolve into the amazing devices that are seen today at any local fairground.

Tips to Decorate a Perfect Red Carpet Wedding

Undoubtly, the matrimony ceremony is the most cherished event in every man and woman's life. This is what we all dream of, since the time we take a dive into the world of adulthood.

Yes, wedding vows between the bride and the groom are the cornerstone of the wedding eve, but there is another aspect which is also of paramount importance, and this is the smiling faces of the witnesses of your special day.

Hosting a wedding celebration is a baffling ask as one has to take care of a number of things. Starting with the crispy, juicy snacks served, the main course the music played in the background, but of all decoration at the party venue which makes a difference between any other celebration and something memorable.

Here, in this post, we dug deep into several ways to decorate a perfect red carpet wedding:

The Entrance

The decor of the entrance should be such it brings in happy and positive vibes. When decorating the entrance to the venue, think in terms of color palette, and not the individual or a combination of one or two colors. The event drapery at the entrance should invite, pick one who design matches seamlessly with the entire party decor.

The Center Stage

For setting up the stage at the wedding venue, you have to mull over several things. Firstly of all, the lighting should illuminate the bride and groom. The backdrop for the stage has to be elegantly dressed with an event backdrop. Buy something, which does not seem like an addition, but an extension of the party decor. Use the same style of fabric for lines, chair covers, and sashes, to make the center stage a topic of positive conversation amongst your invitees.

The Tables

When it comes to tables, do not stick to a rule of thumb, have different tables, the square, the rectangular or the round. But, most important, are the covers for chairs, make sure they appeal in style and design.

The Cake

The cake is another center of attraction, so display it nicely in the center. Go for different colors and textures for the cake. You can also decorate your cake or its surrounding with fresh flowers.

At the end of it all, these tips will help you to dress up an unforgettable wedding party venue. Keep in mind, today, the Internet is the best place to shop for event backdrop, event drapery, linens, and chair covers.

Pros And Cons Of Being A Tattoo Designer

Tattoo designers are one of the most well paid jobs in the industry. However, it is not that easy to a successful tattoo designer. Unless you really have the passion for the art, you can’t be very successful. Here are a few pros and cons of being a tattoo artist.

Pros

Being a tattoo designer has its pros, especially if you love your profession. It is satisfying to see your creativity getting inked on someone else’s body. It is interesting to note how people trust you completely as far as their safety and looks are concerned. If you take your jobs seriously, you will have a large number of clients following you. Even though there will be competition, you will be able to set your own mark in this niche.

Moneywise, like any other business, tattoo artists have highs as well as lows. When you have those ‘high’ times, money flow is fantastic. And it will be your good money managing skills that will help you in the end.

Before you become a full-fledged tattoo designer, you need to be an apprentice of an established tattoo designer. Most of the established tattoo designers love to help the youngsters. You will spend time cleaning and sterilizing their equipment or simply helping them to modify the designs. In the beginning you will be required to create designs on leather. Later you will be asked to work on human skin. This entire process will make you come close to the world of tattooing.

This is a life-long career, which will bring satisfaction to you. Your self-expression is at its best, and if you are giving quality work, your clients will be impressed and come back to you.

You get to meet like-minded people, people who are amazingly artistic and creative, who will have their opinions but would appreciate that you have the right to be in this industry.

Cons

Being a tattoo designer has its share of cons. Establishing yourself in the industry as a recognized artist can be a cumbersome uphill journey. Competition is very high. There are so many aspiring tattoo designers that you will be surprised to know, and creating your mark amongst them would not be an easy task.

Besides that there are so many expenses to take care of. For example you need to maintain sterilized equipment, you have to source and maintain equipment, you have to source all your drawing and art material. If you want to be a custom tattoo artist, then you have to always keep looking for great designs and either modify them or just practice your own skills by drawing, drawing and more drawing!

While money flow may be really good when the business is in boom, it may dwindle during holiday seasons when people go out of the town. It is at this time you have to manage your money in a way that you sustain your business as well as yourself. At those times you would love to ink any person who comes to you, as business is slow.

Overall, if you want to be a tattoo designer, patience is key to it.

Power of Branding and Freedom of Poetry

Maya Angelou once said (I'm paraphrasing) '' the purpose of all life is to be able to live like a poet one day. '' She went on to say that since poets already live like poets, their lives were not a postpone project, but the-ultimate-goal-realized by default.

How many times we have heard of those retirement dreams … the narratives that inevitably start with '' one day I'd like to … '' and continues with a description of one idyllic state or another … a beach house in Key West … playing golf eight hours a day in Arizona … buying a summer house in Florida and moving for good … writing (ah, at long last) that great novel, the chapters of which are lying somewhere inside those moldy cardboard boxes in the basement … to take the oath of chastity and join a monastery or a yoga ashram … take that trip to the Far East … or maybe even to throw itself with passion into a cause that is much larger than one's own limited life, like a political party, a crusade, a fund-raising juggernaut perhaps … on and on.

But underneath it all the aim is to arrive at that sublime state of inner peace and gentleness, something ill-defined but real, fuzzy but warm, a feeling that we feel is our birthright. Underneath it all we do not all point the gyroscopes of our lives to that nebulous state of elation and redemption that we sometimes refer to as '' poetic ''?

The rest is mostly a life-long process of branding ourselves as a desirable product in this increasingly globalized and fickle marketplace.

A brand is a total image with a price, a consistent package with defined and perceived borders. We are engineers. Attorneys. Machinists. Singers. Doctors. Teachers. Experts. Go-to guys. Ministers. Project managers. Historians. Curators. Tank drivers. Chefs. Shrinks. Plumbing … and, yes, Poets. Poets come in branded varieties as well. There is even a '' Poet Laurate '' for the whole United States (for the last few years we were extremely fortunate to have Billy Collins and Stanley Kunits and Ted Kooser as the PT Person).

All branding by definition shuns contradiction and ambivalence like a plague.

Fuzzy logic is fine for hi-tech digital cam-recorders but not for the experts that command healthy speaking fees. CEOs and four star generals are not expected to wear their troubling questions on their sleeves. Researchers at NIH do not get grants and doctors for not knowing what to do in the face of a new virus strain.

If things do not make sense outside a certain framework, then a branded professional knows how not to step outside that framework. A brand provides reproducible solutions to carefully-worded questions. Existentential panic does not command a premium price on the capitalist auction block.

Poetry, on the other hand, is a vulnerable exploration into everything that is left out by branding. It has no guarantees. No guidelines.

You can certainly encourage people to write poems. But I'm not sure at all if you can '' teach '' how to write poetry with the kind of money-back-guarantee bravado that is commonplace for a successful brand.

It is the only Odyssey that each person has to take all alone, go out and wander in the world, meet his demons, take them on one by one, beat them and return home victorious … only to do the same all over again the very next day.

Poetry, to use an analogy that Billy Collins has used in an Alaskan Quarterly Review interview, is like finding something curious sticking out from the sand in a desert and removing all that sand to discover the rest of the intriguing object. In that, poetry represents a vast freedom to rediscover all that is hidden from or by power.

Poetry raises all the in-between states and ambiguities censored by branding. So it is subversive by default.

However in that subversion there is also a deep affirmation of the most basic human value of all – freedom. That's despite the only thing branding can not buy and sell in the marketplace. A brand's power depends only on consumption. Poetry, on the other hand, is free the moment it is produced.

Our world needs more poets get into branded power play. Certainly someone like Leopold Sedar Senghor, a poet who became a statesman, will be remembered for his uplifting and dignified approach to international conflict. And conversely, I hope more branded professionals get into poetry as a way to humanize the market place of good and services.

What if the United Nations held a Poetry Workshop for one day of the year, with mandatory participation for all heads of state?

What if everyone in the world voted for the best Power Poet of the year through the Internet and the winner was declared on Valentine's Day?

Or what if Fortune 500 companies had poetry classes for their managers? Would not that be the ultimate out-of-the-box thinking and problem-solving bonanza on stereoids?

And what would happen if before one country attacked another, the presidents and top generals from both sides were forced to lock themselves in a room and write at least one poem, expressing why they hate the "other guys" and why they must fight? What if those poems were then distributed to the citizens of both nations and the world? Perhaps they would still go on and fight. And otherwise, just a tiny little shivering perhaps, they would not.

Without poetic abilities, branding easily degrades into a repetition of the past. If you are building a bridge, repetition of the past experience might actually be a beneficial discipline since no one wants to re-discover trigonometry every time there is a river to cross.

But in much more complex affairs of the heart, of which I consider international politics to institute just a small subset, the vulnerable freedom of a poem could be the only thing standing between our endangered humanity and the discovery of our birthright freedom – and even perhaps salvation.